Denali Fault system of southern Alaska: an interior strike-slip structure responding to dextral and sinistral shear coupling

T. F. Redfield, Paul G Fitzgerald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Denali fault system (DFS) extends for ~1200 km, from southeast to south central Alaska. The DFS has been generally regarded as a right-lateral strike-slip fault, along which post late Mesozoic offsets of up to 400 km have been suggested. The consequent kinematic model predicts that left-lateral stresses have acted upon the western end of the DFS for much of its history, and conflicting senses of shear exist between the eastern and western ends of the system. The offset history of the western end of the Denali fault system should be significantly different than the history of the central and eastern sections; consequently, individual crustal blocks in southeast and southwest Alaska may have undergone, respectively, clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1195-1208
Number of pages14
JournalTectonics
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Strike-slip faults
Kinematics
slip
histories
shear
history
kinematics
strike-slip fault

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Denali Fault system of southern Alaska : an interior strike-slip structure responding to dextral and sinistral shear coupling. / Redfield, T. F.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.

In: Tectonics, Vol. 12, No. 5, 1993, p. 1195-1208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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