Current and Future Food Insufficiency During Covid-19: Examining Disparities by Race/Ethnicity and Recent Work Loss

Claire E. Altman, Molly Dondero, Colleen M. Heflin, Dashiell Nusbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Covid-19 pandemic, which began in early 2020, has eroded the previous decade’s reductions in food insecurity. Pandemic-related food insufficiency has been concentrated among Black and Hispanic households and those who have experienced a recent work loss. Households with children are particularly vulnerable. Using the first twenty-one weeks of the US Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey data from April 2020 through December of 2020, we examine the association between recent work losses and food insufficiency and document the extent to which the impact varies by race/ethnicity. Work loss is predictive of current and future food insufficiency, with the association most acutely experienced by Blacks and Hispanics and households with children. There is evidence of racial/ethnic disparities in current and future food insufficiency. The results provide insight into how the pandemic has widened racial/ethnic gaps in the experience of food insufficiency despite recent policy interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Covid-19
  • Food insecurity
  • Household Pulse Survey
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Work loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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