Curiosity as a personality variable influencing learning in a learner controlled lesson with and without advisement

Marilyn P. Arnone, Barbara L. Grabowski, Christopher P. Rynd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of curiosity on learning art education facts and concepts by first- and second-graders in computer-based interactive learner control environments with and without advisement. High-curious subjects, who generally prefer a higher degree of unfamiliarity and uncertainty, were predicted to perform better in either learner control environment than low-curious children. All children regardless of curiosity level were expected to perform better in the advisement condition than in the no-advisement condition. As predicted, a significant difference in achievement scores favored the high-curious children in both conditions. Although there was no main treatment effect, exploratory analyses revealed an unpredicted significant interaction between grade level and treatment. First-graders performed significantly better with advisement than without advisement while second-graders performed better without. Examination of treatment usage data indicated that first-graders followed advisement more than did second-graders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-20
Number of pages16
JournalEducational Technology Research and Development
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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