Correction

An analysis of costs and health co-benefits for a U.S. power plant carbon standard

Jonathan J. Buonocore, Kathleen F. Lambert, Dallas Burtraw, Samantha Sekar, Charles T Driscoll

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

There are numerical errors in the first two sentences of the "Policy Implications" heading under the Results and Discussion section. The correct sentences are: We found that for a moderately stringent, highly flexible policy scenario similar to the final U.S. Clean Power Plan, the monetized value of health co-benefits alone exceed estimated costs for the U.S. by $12 billion per year in 2020. When the social cost of carbon is included, the benefits increase from $29 billion to $50 billion with national net benefits of $33 billion per year in 2020.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0158792
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Power Plants
cost analysis
power plants
Insurance Benefits
Power plants
Carbon
Health
Costs and Cost Analysis
carbon
heading
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Correction : An analysis of costs and health co-benefits for a U.S. power plant carbon standard. / Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Burtraw, Dallas; Sekar, Samantha; Driscoll, Charles T.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 6, e0158792, 01.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Buonocore, Jonathan J. ; Lambert, Kathleen F. ; Burtraw, Dallas ; Sekar, Samantha ; Driscoll, Charles T. / Correction : An analysis of costs and health co-benefits for a U.S. power plant carbon standard. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 6.
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