Correcting Political and Consumer Misperceptions: The Effectiveness and Effects of Rating Scale Versus Contextual Correction Formats

Michelle A. Amazeen, Emily Thorson, Ashley Muddiman, Lucas Graves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

While fact-checking has grown dramatically in the last decade, little is known about the relative effectiveness of different formats in correcting false beliefs or overcoming partisan resistance to new information. This article addresses that gap by using theories from communication and psychology to compare two prevailing approaches: An online experiment examined how the use of visual “truth scales” interacts with partisanship to shape the effectiveness of corrections. We find that truth scales make fact-checks more effective in some conditions. Contrary to theoretical predictions and the fears of some journalists, their use does not increase partisan backlash against the correction or the organization that produced it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-48
Number of pages21
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • fact-checking
  • journalism
  • media effects
  • political communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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