Coproducing healthcare

individual-level impacts of engaging citizens to develop recommendations for reducing diagnostic error

Suyeon Jo, Tina Nabatchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Coproduction has received considerable attention from scholars and practitioners in recent years. While theory and some research suggest that coproduction can have individual-level effects on participating lay actors, few studies have tested such hypothesized effects. This study seeks to add to the evidence base for collective coproduction. Using data from a randomized and controlled research project, it examines whether collective coproduction affects participants’ issue awareness, perceived empowerment, trust in service professionals, and support for coproduction. The results provide empirical evidence that collective coproduction can significantly increase issue awareness, empowerment, and trust. The results for support of coproduction are mixed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-375
Number of pages22
JournalPublic Management Review
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2019

Fingerprint

Healthcare
Diagnostics
Co-production
Power (Psychology)
Empowerment
Empirical evidence
Professional services
Level effect
Support services

Keywords

  • Coproduction
  • effects of coproduction
  • empowerment
  • issue awareness
  • trust in professionals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Coproducing healthcare : individual-level impacts of engaging citizens to develop recommendations for reducing diagnostic error. / Jo, Suyeon; Nabatchi, Tina.

In: Public Management Review, Vol. 21, No. 3, 04.03.2019, p. 354-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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