Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species

Maria S. Smith, Jason D. Fridley, Jingjing Yin, Taryn L. Bauerle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number486
JournalFrontiers in Plant Science
Volume4
Issue numberNOV
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2013

Keywords

  • Efficiency vs. Safety
  • Embolism vulnerability
  • Exotic woody plants
  • Hydraulic conductivity
  • Vessel connectivity
  • Xylem anatomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this