Consumer beliefs about radio frequency identification (RFID) systems

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The most widely publicized privacy concern about Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems revolves around the inclusion of RFID tags in consumer goods, with the concomitant fear that parties other than the consumer will be able to detect the presence and location of a tagged object. The author used a conceptual framework developed by Mick and Fournier (1998) to understand consumer reactions to RFID technology. Results of a survey of a random sample of N=60 U.S. respondents showed that consumers have little knowledge of RFID technology. About half expressed concerns for privacy related to RFID. Elements of the framework predicted these concerns. Those who were better informed about RFID were also more likely to express concerns about freedom and dependency related to the technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAssociation for Information Systems - 12th Americas Conference On Information Systems, AMCIS 2006
Pages3334-3340
Number of pages7
Volume6
StatePublished - 2006
Event12th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2006 - Acapulco, Mexico
Duration: Aug 4 2006Aug 6 2006

Other

Other12th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2006
CountryMexico
CityAcapulco
Period8/4/068/6/06

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Keywords

  • Consumer attitudes
  • Consumer beliefs
  • Radio frequency identification
  • RFID

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Information Systems

Cite this

Stanton, J. M. (2006). Consumer beliefs about radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. In Association for Information Systems - 12th Americas Conference On Information Systems, AMCIS 2006 (Vol. 6, pp. 3334-3340)