Conceptual Replication of Four Key Findings about Factual Corrections and Misinformation during the 2020 US Election: Evidence from Panel-Survey Experiments

Alexander Coppock, Kimberly Gross, Ethan Porter, Emily Thorson, Thomas J. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the final two months of the 2020 US election, we conducted eight panel experiments to evaluate the immediate and medium-term effects of misinformation and factual corrections. Our results corroborate four sets of existing findings: fact-checks reliably improve factual accuracy, while misinformation degrades it; effects of fact-checks on belief accuracy endure, though they fade with time; effects on attitudes are minuscule; and there are important partisan asymmetries. We also offer one new empirical finding suggesting that effect heterogeneities by personality type and cognitive style may reflect attention paid to treatments. Our study confirms that the fundamental push and pull of misinformation and factual corrections on political beliefs holds even in electoral settings as saturated with mistruths as the 2020 US election.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1328-1341
Number of pages14
JournalBritish Journal of Political Science
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2023

Keywords

  • 2020 US election
  • factual corrections
  • misinformation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations

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