Comparison of distributed demand controlled ventilation in various United States climates

Dustin W. Demetriou, H. Ezzat Khalifa

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Conventional HVAC systems are incapable of providing control over individual environments or adjusting fresh air supply based on the dynamic occupancy of an office building. In DDCV, fresh air is provided to each micro-environment based on input from distributed sensors (CO2, VOC) to provide individual control over IAQ. In previous work, a simulation model was developed which allowed for the assessment of DDCV system implementation. Current work uses that model for the assessment of various DDCV methodologies in a model office building. The assessment of the DDCV system was performed for 6 United States cities, each of which represented a different Department of Energy climate region within the U.S. The model was used to determine both the annual energy requirements of various DDCV scenarios compared to the identical building ventilated using ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004 ventilation rate procedure. By implementing CO2-based DDCV a reduction in both occupant CO 2 and VOC exposure and annual energy consumption is possible, compared to the conventional ASHRAE ventilation system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Event9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009 - Syracuse, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 13 2009Sep 17 2009

Other

Other9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySyracuse, NY
Period9/13/099/17/09

Keywords

  • Demand controlled ventilation
  • Indoor air quality
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

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    Demetriou, D. W., & Khalifa, H. E. (2009). Comparison of distributed demand controlled ventilation in various United States climates. Paper presented at 9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009, Syracuse, NY, United States.