Clay faces in an abolitionist church

The Wesleyan Methodist Church in Syracuse, New York

Douglas Armstrong, LouAnn Wurst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For many years, a group of sculpted clay faces, in desperate and immediate need of conservation, tenuously clung to the walls of the dug-out space called a "tunnel" beneath the former Wesleyan Methodist Church, the home of a noted abolitionist and social-reform oriented congregation in downtown Syracuse, New York. Archaeological and historical research indicates a 19th-century origin for the faces. The church openly participated in abolition and the Underground Railroad, and housed a national abolitionist press. However, even in a pro-emancipation community such as Syracuse, the dangers for refugees fleeing bondage were real, and the consequences of capture were life threatening. This was particularly true after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850. This study presents evidence that the clay faces may have been created by African American refugees from slavery. Moreover, it describes a community's efforts to conserve and protect this resource.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-37
Number of pages19
JournalHistorical Archaeology
Volume37
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2003

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refugee
church
social reform
emancipation
slavery
slave
railroad
city center
community
conservation
act
resources
evidence
Group
Syracuse
Refugees
Methodist Church
Abolitionist
American
Historical Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology
  • History

Cite this

Clay faces in an abolitionist church : The Wesleyan Methodist Church in Syracuse, New York. / Armstrong, Douglas; Wurst, LouAnn.

In: Historical Archaeology, Vol. 37, No. 2, 2003, p. 19-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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