Changing Me to Keep You: State Jealousy Promotes Perceiving Similarity Between the Self and a Romantic Rival

Erica B. Slotter, Gale M. Lucas, Brittany Jakubiak, Heather Lasslett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Individuals sometimes alter their self-views to be more similar to others-traditionally romantic partners-because they are motivated to do so. A common motivating force is the desire to affiliate with a partner. The current research examined whether a different motivation-romantic jealousy-might promote individuals to alter their self-views to be more similar to a romantic rival, rather than a partner. Romantic jealousy occurs when individuals perceive a rival as a threat to their relationship and motivates individuals to defend their relationship. We proposed that one novel way that individuals might defend their relationship is by seeing themselves as more similar to a perceived romantic rival. We predicted individuals would alter their self-views to be more similar to a rival that they believed their partner found attractive. Importantly, we predicted that state romantic jealousy would motivate these self-alterations. Three studies confirmed these hypotheses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1280-1292
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Self-concept malleability
  • motivation
  • relationship maintenance
  • romantic jealousy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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