Campus racial climate perceptions and overall sense of belonging among racially diverse women in STEM majors

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65 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the contributions of campus racial climate perceptions and other college environments to overall sense of belonging among racially diverse women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors. The sample included 1,722 women from the 2004 National Study of Living-Learning Programs. Using a conceptual framework that integrated Weidman's (1989) undergraduate socialization model, Astin's (1991) I-E-O model, and Mertens' (2005) transformative research perspective, 29% of the variance in overall sense of belonging was explained. Race/ethnicity, perceptions of the campus racial climate and the residence hall climate, and academic self-confidence emerged as significant predictors. Implications for supporting women in STEM are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-346
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of College Student Development
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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