Camouflaging Consumption and Colonial Mimicry: The Materiality of an Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Nipmuc Household

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article serves as an interpretation of Nipmuc history in colonial contexts by focusing on the engagement and survival of the "capitalist colonial" world by the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Nipmuc inhabitants of the Sarah Boston Farmstead Site in Grafton, Massachusetts. Ceramic analyses are drawn upon to argue that active consumer strategies and/or choices may potentially undermine the material and discursive markers of difference linked to notions of domesticity, class and race. The apparent homogenized or "insignificant" character of the Sarah Boston Farmstead ceramic assemblage is argued to in fact be quite significant, as its banality speaks to a degree of knowledgeable "mimicry"-tactical or not-that may have deflected (but not negated) inequality through the undermining of markers and discourses of difference.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-174
Number of pages29
JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Colonialism
  • Consumption
  • New England
  • Postcolonial theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Archaeology
  • History
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Camouflaging Consumption and Colonial Mimicry: The Materiality of an Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Nipmuc Household'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this