Brain Signatures of Early and Late Neural Measures of Auditory Habituation and Discrimination in Autism and Their Relationship to Autistic Traits and Sensory Overresponsivity

Emily Cary, Devon Pacheco, Elizabeth Kaplan-Kahn, Elizabeth McKernan, Erin Matsuba, Beth Prieve, Natalie Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sensory differences are included in the DSM-5 criteria of autism for the first time, yet it is unclear how they relate to neural indicators of perception. We studied early brain signatures of perception and examined their relationship to sensory behaviors and autistic traits. Thirteen autistic children and 13 Typically Developing (TD) children matched on age and nonverbal IQ participated in a passive oddball task, during which P1 habituation and P1 and MMN discrimination were evoked by pure tones. Autistic children had less neural habituation than the TD comparison group, and the MMN, but not P1, mapped on to sensory overresponsivity. Findings highlight the significance of temporal and contextual factors in neural information processing as it relates to autistic traits and sensory behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Brain-behavior correlates
  • Discrimination
  • ERPs
  • Habituation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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