Beliefs About Mothers' and Fathers' Roles and the Division of Child Care and Household Labor in Indo-Caribbean Immigrants With Young Children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a creolization conceptual framework, this study assessed beliefs about paternal and maternal roles, time spent in child care, and household labor among 60 Indo-Caribbean immigrant couples with young children. Analyses revealed belief systems about maternal and paternal roles that fell along traditional lines. Mothers invested significantly more time in major areas of child care and domestic labor than fathers did. Findings are discussed in terms of the lack of movement away from traditional gendered ideologies and the assumption of child care and household labor in Indo-Caribbean families in their new cultural community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-182
Number of pages10
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

Keywords

  • Caribbean immigrant families
  • belief systems
  • child care and household labor
  • creolization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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