Authority Claim in Rationale-Containing Online Comments

Lu Xiao, Xin Huo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We examined whether the existence of authority claims signifies one’s rationales in online communication content, potentially contributing to the research on rationale identification and rationale generation. Authority claims are statements that reveal the writer’s intention to bolster the writer’s credibility. In open online communications, the anonymity and the dynamic participation make it challenging to establish the credibility of their viewpoints and reasoning. Therefore, we hypothesize these online participants will tend to use authority claims to bolster their credibility when presenting their justifications. We annotated authority claims in 271 text segments that contain online users’ rationales. These text segments are adapted from the open access corpora provided by Rutgers’ Argument Mining group. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that in our dataset the users scarcely attempted to bolster their credibility when presenting their reasoning to the others in these activities. We call for more investigations to explore the role of activity context affects participants’ use of authority claims in their reasoning traces. We further state that the effects of communication medium on individuals’ cognitive and meta-cognitive processes are important to consider in argument mining research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInformation in Contemporary Society - 14th International Conference, iConference 2019, Proceedings
EditorsBonnie Nardi, Natalie Greene Taylor, Caitlin Christian-Lamb, Michelle H. Martin
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages690-696
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9783030157418
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event14th International Conference on Information in Contemporary Society, iConference 2019 - Washington, United States
Duration: Mar 31 2019Apr 3 2019

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume11420 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference14th International Conference on Information in Contemporary Society, iConference 2019
CountryUnited States
CityWashington
Period3/31/194/3/19

Fingerprint

Credibility
Communication
Reasoning
Mining
Anonymity
Justification
Trace
Tend
Text

Keywords

  • Annotation
  • Authority claim
  • Computer-mediated communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Xiao, L., & Huo, X. (2019). Authority Claim in Rationale-Containing Online Comments. In B. Nardi, N. G. Taylor, C. Christian-Lamb, & M. H. Martin (Eds.), Information in Contemporary Society - 14th International Conference, iConference 2019, Proceedings (pp. 690-696). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 11420 LNCS). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15742-5_65

Authority Claim in Rationale-Containing Online Comments. / Xiao, Lu; Huo, Xin.

Information in Contemporary Society - 14th International Conference, iConference 2019, Proceedings. ed. / Bonnie Nardi; Natalie Greene Taylor; Caitlin Christian-Lamb; Michelle H. Martin. Springer Verlag, 2019. p. 690-696 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 11420 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Xiao, L & Huo, X 2019, Authority Claim in Rationale-Containing Online Comments. in B Nardi, NG Taylor, C Christian-Lamb & MH Martin (eds), Information in Contemporary Society - 14th International Conference, iConference 2019, Proceedings. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 11420 LNCS, Springer Verlag, pp. 690-696, 14th International Conference on Information in Contemporary Society, iConference 2019, Washington, United States, 3/31/19. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15742-5_65
Xiao L, Huo X. Authority Claim in Rationale-Containing Online Comments. In Nardi B, Taylor NG, Christian-Lamb C, Martin MH, editors, Information in Contemporary Society - 14th International Conference, iConference 2019, Proceedings. Springer Verlag. 2019. p. 690-696. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15742-5_65
Xiao, Lu ; Huo, Xin. / Authority Claim in Rationale-Containing Online Comments. Information in Contemporary Society - 14th International Conference, iConference 2019, Proceedings. editor / Bonnie Nardi ; Natalie Greene Taylor ; Caitlin Christian-Lamb ; Michelle H. Martin. Springer Verlag, 2019. pp. 690-696 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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