Auditory and cognitive behavioral performance deficits and symptom reporting in postconcussion syndrome following mild traumatic brain injury

Kathy Vander Werff, Brian Rieger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined auditory deficits and symptom reporting in individuals with long-term postconcussion symptoms following a single mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) compared to age- and gender-matched controls without a history of mTBI. Method: Case history interviews, symptom questionnaires, and a battery of central auditory and neuropsychological tests were administered to 2 groups. The mTBI group was a civilian population recruited from a local concussion management program who were seeking rehabilitation for postconcussion-related problems in a postacute period between 3 and 18 months following injury. Symptom validity testing was included to assess the rate of possible insufficient test effort and its influence on scores for all outcome measures. Analyses of group differences in test scores were performed both with and without the participants who showed insufficient test effort. Rates of symptom reporting, correlations among symptoms and behavioral test outcomes, and the relationships between auditory and cognitive test performance were analyzed. Results: The mTBI group reported a high rate of auditory symptoms and general postconcussion symptoms. Performance on neuropsychological tests of cognitive function showed some differences in raw scores between groups, but when effort was considered, there were no significant differences in the rate of abnormal performance between groups. In contrast, there were significant differences in both raw scores and the rate of abnormal performance between groups for some auditory tests when only considering participants with sufficient effort. Auditory symptoms were strongly correlated with other general postconcussion symptoms. Conclusions: Significant auditory symptoms and evidence of long-term central auditory dysfunction were found in a subset of individuals who had chronic postconcussion symptoms after a single mTBI unrelated to blast trauma. The rate of abnormal performance on auditory behavioral tests exceeded the rate of abnormal performance on tests of cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2501-2518
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume62
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Brain Concussion
brain
deficit
Neuropsychological Tests
performance
Cognition
Central Auditory Diseases
Group
Wounds and Injuries
Rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Hearing
Traumatic Brain Injury
Syndrome
Interviews
civilian population
Population
rehabilitation
trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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title = "Auditory and cognitive behavioral performance deficits and symptom reporting in postconcussion syndrome following mild traumatic brain injury",
abstract = "Purpose: This study examined auditory deficits and symptom reporting in individuals with long-term postconcussion symptoms following a single mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) compared to age- and gender-matched controls without a history of mTBI. Method: Case history interviews, symptom questionnaires, and a battery of central auditory and neuropsychological tests were administered to 2 groups. The mTBI group was a civilian population recruited from a local concussion management program who were seeking rehabilitation for postconcussion-related problems in a postacute period between 3 and 18 months following injury. Symptom validity testing was included to assess the rate of possible insufficient test effort and its influence on scores for all outcome measures. Analyses of group differences in test scores were performed both with and without the participants who showed insufficient test effort. Rates of symptom reporting, correlations among symptoms and behavioral test outcomes, and the relationships between auditory and cognitive test performance were analyzed. Results: The mTBI group reported a high rate of auditory symptoms and general postconcussion symptoms. Performance on neuropsychological tests of cognitive function showed some differences in raw scores between groups, but when effort was considered, there were no significant differences in the rate of abnormal performance between groups. In contrast, there were significant differences in both raw scores and the rate of abnormal performance between groups for some auditory tests when only considering participants with sufficient effort. Auditory symptoms were strongly correlated with other general postconcussion symptoms. Conclusions: Significant auditory symptoms and evidence of long-term central auditory dysfunction were found in a subset of individuals who had chronic postconcussion symptoms after a single mTBI unrelated to blast trauma. The rate of abnormal performance on auditory behavioral tests exceeded the rate of abnormal performance on tests of cognitive function.",
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AB - Purpose: This study examined auditory deficits and symptom reporting in individuals with long-term postconcussion symptoms following a single mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) compared to age- and gender-matched controls without a history of mTBI. Method: Case history interviews, symptom questionnaires, and a battery of central auditory and neuropsychological tests were administered to 2 groups. The mTBI group was a civilian population recruited from a local concussion management program who were seeking rehabilitation for postconcussion-related problems in a postacute period between 3 and 18 months following injury. Symptom validity testing was included to assess the rate of possible insufficient test effort and its influence on scores for all outcome measures. Analyses of group differences in test scores were performed both with and without the participants who showed insufficient test effort. Rates of symptom reporting, correlations among symptoms and behavioral test outcomes, and the relationships between auditory and cognitive test performance were analyzed. Results: The mTBI group reported a high rate of auditory symptoms and general postconcussion symptoms. Performance on neuropsychological tests of cognitive function showed some differences in raw scores between groups, but when effort was considered, there were no significant differences in the rate of abnormal performance between groups. In contrast, there were significant differences in both raw scores and the rate of abnormal performance between groups for some auditory tests when only considering participants with sufficient effort. Auditory symptoms were strongly correlated with other general postconcussion symptoms. Conclusions: Significant auditory symptoms and evidence of long-term central auditory dysfunction were found in a subset of individuals who had chronic postconcussion symptoms after a single mTBI unrelated to blast trauma. The rate of abnormal performance on auditory behavioral tests exceeded the rate of abnormal performance on tests of cognitive function.

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