Associations Among Supportive Coparenting, Father Engagement and Attachment: The Role of Race/Ethnicity

Sangita Pudasainee-Kapri, Rachel A Razza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined the longitudinal associations among supportive coparenting and father engagement during infancy and mother–child attachment in toddlerhood within an at-risk sample (N = 1371). Of particular interest was whether these associations were moderated by race/ethnicity. Mothers reported on coparenting and father engagement during the 1-year interview and mother–child attachment was assessed using the Toddler Attachment Sort-39 at age three during the in-home visit. Findings suggest that supportive coparenting was significantly associated with higher levels of father engagement and more secure mother–child attachment relationship for both white and minority families. In addition, race/ethnicity moderated the link between supportive coparenting and father engagement such that the link was stronger among white families compared to minority families. Results highlight the significance of coparenting for father engagement and the mother–child attachment relationship. The implications of these findings are discussed for interventions targeting coparenting and positive paternal engagement among at-risk children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3793-3804
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 17 2015

Keywords

  • Attachment
  • Coparenting
  • Father engagement
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Supportive coparenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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