Assessment of endothelial function and blood metabolite status following acute ingestion of a fructose-containing beverage

A. J. Bidwell, M. E. Holmstrup, Robert Patrick Doyle, T. J. Fairchild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Fructose intake has increased concurrent with sugar intake and this increase has been implicated in contributing to the development of metabolic syndrome risk factors. Recent evidence suggests a role for uric acid (UA) as a potential mediator via suppression of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. The aim of this study was to explore this hypothesis by measuring changes in UA concentration and systemic NO bioavailability as well as endothelial function in response to acute ingestion of a glucose-fructose beverage. Methods: Ten young (26.80 ± 4.80 years), non-obese (body mass index: 25.1 ± 2.55 kg m-2; percent body fat: 13.5 ± 6.9%) male subjects ingested either a glucose (100 g dextrose in 300 mL) or isocaloric glucose-fructose (glucose : fructose; 45 : 55 g in 300 mL) beverage. Blood was sampled pre- and every 15-min post-ingestion per 90 min and assayed for glucose, lactate, fructose, total nitrate/nitrate, UA and blood lipids. Forearm blood flow and pulse-wave velocity were recorded prior to and at 30 and 45 min time intervals post-ingestion, respectively, while heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded every 15 min. Results: The glucose-fructose ingestion was associated with a significant (P < 0.05) increase in plasma lactate concentration and altered free fatty acid levels when compared with glucose-only ingestion. However, UA was not significantly different (P = 0.08) between conditions (AUC: -1018 ± 1675 vs. 2171 ± 1270 μmol L -1 per 90 min for glucose and glucose-fructose conditions respectively). Consequently, no significant (P < 0.05) difference in endothelial function or systemic NO bioavailability was observed. Conclusion: Acute consumption of a fructose-containing beverage was not associated with significantly altered UA concentration, endothelial function or systemic NO bioavailability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalActa Physiologica
Volume200
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Beverages
Fructose
Eating
Glucose
Uric Acid
Biological Availability
Nitric Oxide
Nitrates
Lactic Acid
Blood Pressure
Pulse Wave Analysis
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Forearm
Area Under Curve
Adipose Tissue
Body Mass Index
Heart Rate
Lipids

Keywords

  • endothelial function
  • fructose
  • nitric oxide
  • reactive hyperaemia
  • uric acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Assessment of endothelial function and blood metabolite status following acute ingestion of a fructose-containing beverage. / Bidwell, A. J.; Holmstrup, M. E.; Doyle, Robert Patrick; Fairchild, T. J.

In: Acta Physiologica, Vol. 200, No. 1, 09.2010, p. 35-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aim: Fructose intake has increased concurrent with sugar intake and this increase has been implicated in contributing to the development of metabolic syndrome risk factors. Recent evidence suggests a role for uric acid (UA) as a potential mediator via suppression of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. The aim of this study was to explore this hypothesis by measuring changes in UA concentration and systemic NO bioavailability as well as endothelial function in response to acute ingestion of a glucose-fructose beverage. Methods: Ten young (26.80 ± 4.80 years), non-obese (body mass index: 25.1 ± 2.55 kg m-2; percent body fat: 13.5 ± 6.9{\%}) male subjects ingested either a glucose (100 g dextrose in 300 mL) or isocaloric glucose-fructose (glucose : fructose; 45 : 55 g in 300 mL) beverage. Blood was sampled pre- and every 15-min post-ingestion per 90 min and assayed for glucose, lactate, fructose, total nitrate/nitrate, UA and blood lipids. Forearm blood flow and pulse-wave velocity were recorded prior to and at 30 and 45 min time intervals post-ingestion, respectively, while heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded every 15 min. Results: The glucose-fructose ingestion was associated with a significant (P < 0.05) increase in plasma lactate concentration and altered free fatty acid levels when compared with glucose-only ingestion. However, UA was not significantly different (P = 0.08) between conditions (AUC: -1018 ± 1675 vs. 2171 ± 1270 μmol L -1 per 90 min for glucose and glucose-fructose conditions respectively). Consequently, no significant (P < 0.05) difference in endothelial function or systemic NO bioavailability was observed. Conclusion: Acute consumption of a fructose-containing beverage was not associated with significantly altered UA concentration, endothelial function or systemic NO bioavailability.",
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