Asian alumni in America and their leadership skills

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we focus on international alumni-students from other countries who graduated from U.S. universities-and their leadership skills as they leave the university. The goals were, first, to identify the elements of leadership that international alumni found that they most needed after graduation, and second, to see how competent feel they were in these skills immediately after graduation. The research relied on both qualitative and quantitative data involving alumni from Asia. From the survey, we learned that no single skill is more important than the others, and in fact, all of the most highly rated skills represent the spectrum of soft skills that one would expect to have in a professional setting. Of these, the students wished they had learned more about communication skills, conflict resolution, and goal setting. From the interviews with Asian alumni who took a leadership program, we learned that the students had learned about themselves and had learned from each other about their different cultures. They mentioned the skills they had acquired for working in groups and the communication and interactions that helped them build confidence and take initiative, which also transferred to their workplaces after they graduated. The study results show that most of the skills alumni perceive to be important in the workplace can be learned more systematically in a leadership program. The benefits that students receive from these programs, as well as the benefits that the university can receive from graduating students with these skills, should give higher educational institutions a motivation to implement these programs, if not broadly, at least for the segments of their international population that need them the most.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUnderstanding International Students from Asia in American Universities
Subtitle of host publicationLearning and Living Globalization
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages241-265
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9783319603940
ISBN (Print)9783319603926
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

alumni
leadership
student
university
workplace
conflict resolution
educational institution
communication skills
confidence
communication
interaction
interview
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Garcia-Murillo, M. A. (2017). Asian alumni in America and their leadership skills. In Understanding International Students from Asia in American Universities: Learning and Living Globalization (pp. 241-265). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60394-0_12

Asian alumni in America and their leadership skills. / Garcia-Murillo, Martha A.

Understanding International Students from Asia in American Universities: Learning and Living Globalization. Springer International Publishing, 2017. p. 241-265.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Garcia-Murillo, MA 2017, Asian alumni in America and their leadership skills. in Understanding International Students from Asia in American Universities: Learning and Living Globalization. Springer International Publishing, pp. 241-265. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60394-0_12
Garcia-Murillo MA. Asian alumni in America and their leadership skills. In Understanding International Students from Asia in American Universities: Learning and Living Globalization. Springer International Publishing. 2017. p. 241-265 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60394-0_12
Garcia-Murillo, Martha A. / Asian alumni in America and their leadership skills. Understanding International Students from Asia in American Universities: Learning and Living Globalization. Springer International Publishing, 2017. pp. 241-265
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