Anthropology, the meaning of community, and prevention

C. Timothy McKeown, Robert A Rubinstein, James G. Kelly

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Successful health promotion and disease prevention efforts must be designed with a thorough knowledge of the community in which they are to be used. Unfortunately, our understanding of the term 'community' is currently in a muddle. In this paper we clarify the nature of communities by examining how the concept has been treated in four classic community studies. Three important points emerge: that community is a multifaceted concept, that communities are best viewed as assortments of social processes, and that each community has within it many different communities. We then illustrate these findings with a commentary on Kelly's often cited longitudinal community psychology study of adolescent boys attending two high schools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPrevention
Subtitle of host publicationToward a Multidisciplinary Approach
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages35-64
Number of pages30
ISBN (Electronic)9781317736011
ISBN (Print)9781315791609
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

McKeown, C. T., Rubinstein, R. A., & Kelly, J. G. (2014). Anthropology, the meaning of community, and prevention. In Prevention: Toward a Multidisciplinary Approach (pp. 35-64). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315791609