Analysis of transient scattering from real complex structures composed of conducting and dielectric bodies

Tapan K. Sarkar, Wonwoo Lee, Sadasiva M. Rao

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

time-domain surface integral equation approach based on the electric field formulation is utilized to calculate the transient scattering from real complex structures composed of both conducting and dielectric bodies. The solution method is based on the method of moments and involves the modeling of an arbitrary shaped structure in conjunction with the triangular patch basis functions. An implicit method is described to solve the coupled integral equations derived utilizing the equivalence principle directly in the time domain, and the usual late time instabilities associated with the time domain integral equations are avoided by using this implicit scheme. The structure used in this paper is an aircraft that has many different shaped triangular patches to make close enough to the real aircraft. Mathematical and numerical steps are presented along with representative numerical results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEuropean Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering, ECCOMAS 2000
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
EventEuropean Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering, ECCOMAS 2000 - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: Sep 11 2000Sep 14 2000

Publication series

NameEuropean Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering, ECCOMAS 2000

Other

OtherEuropean Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering, ECCOMAS 2000
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period9/11/009/14/00

Keywords

  • Composite structure
  • Method of moment
  • Stability
  • Surface integral equation
  • Transient scattering
  • Triangular patches

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Applied Mathematics

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