An East Indian laborers' household in nineteenth-century Jamaica: A case for understanding cultural diversity through space, chronology, and material analysis

Douglas Armstrong, Mark W. Hauser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cultural diversity is a hallmark of the Caribbean region. This diversity is the result of many diasporas, including European, African, East Asian, and East Indian. Historical archaeology has focused on cultural permutations of the demographically dominant European and African groups. The archaeological record of other groups is present and can add to our understanding of the true depth of diversity in the emergence of social landscapes. This paper explores chronological, spatial, and material evidence related to an East Indian laborers' household excavated in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica. The ways in which space was structured and materials used were distinct from patterns observed in the households of African Jamaicans who resided in a separate locus at the same site. This data suggests potential of examining cultural identities through archaeology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-21
Number of pages13
JournalHistorical archaeology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • History
  • Archaeology

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