Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

Clinton E. Canal, Qing Chang, Paul E. Gold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by ≈1,000-17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12500-12505
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume104
Issue number30
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 24 2007

Keywords

  • Anisomycin
  • Norepinephrine
  • Protein synthesis-dependent memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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