Alternative international systems? System structure and violent conflict in nineteenth-century West Africa, Southeast Asia, and South Asia

Charles Butcher, Ryan Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Were precolonial state systems different to the European model? If so, how did these state systems vary, and do variations in system structure influence the frequency of war? In this article we assess the structure off international systems in nineteenth-century West Africa, Southeast Asia, and South Asia using new data on precolonial states that corrects for some of the biases in the existing Correlates of War state system membership data. We develop a framework to capture variation in political order above and below the state, and explore the similarities and differences between these systems and the European system we know and study. We then assess how rates of inter-and intra-state war varied across these systems. Our results suggest: (1) It is the nature of hierarchy (not so much anarchy) that varies across these systems; and (2) inter-state wars are more frequent, but less intense, in systems composed of decentralised states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-737
Number of pages23
JournalReview of International Studies
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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