Airborne levels of cadmium are correlated with urinary cadmium concentrations among young children living in the New York state city of Syracuse, USA

Dustin T. Hill, Vikrant Jandev, Michael Petroni, Nader Atallah-Yunes, Kestas Bendinskas, Lynn S. Brann, Kevin Heffernan, David A. Larsen, James A. MacKenzie, Christopher D. Palmer, Patrick J. Parsons, Brooks B. Gump, Mary B. Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Air pollution is a serious public health issue with early childhood exposure being of high concern because of the greater risk that children might experience negative health outcomes. Industrial sources in and near communities are one potential path of exposure that children might face with greater levels of air pollution correlating with higher levels of toxicants detected in children. We compare estimated ambient air concentrations of Cadmium (Cd) to a cohort (n = 281) of 9 to 11-year old children during their early childhood years (0–5 years of age) in a mid-size city in Upstate New York. Levels of Cd air pollution are compared to children's urine-Cd levels. Urine has been shown to be a superior biomarker to blood for Cd exposure particularly for longer-term exposures. We find that participants who reside in households that faced greater Cd air pollution during the child's early years have higher urine-Cd levels. This association is stable and stronger than previously presented associations for blood-Cd. Findings support expanded use of air modelling data for risk screening to reduce the potential health burden that industrial pollution can have.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number115450
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume223
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2023

Keywords

  • Cadmium
  • Exposure
  • Industrial air pollution
  • Risk screening environmental indicators geographic microdata (RSEI-GM)
  • Toxicants
  • Urine metal levels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • General Environmental Science

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