Advanced LIGO

ligo Scientific Collaboration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

681 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number074001
JournalClassical and Quantum Gravity
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 9 2015

Fingerprint

LIGO (observatory)
recycling
gravitational waves
sensitivity
low frequencies
Michelson interferometers
high power lasers
frequency response
isolation
interferometers
mirrors
coatings
cavities
detectors
lasers
interactions

Keywords

  • gravitational waves
  • interferometers
  • optics
  • seismic isolation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

ligo Scientific Collaboration (2015). Advanced LIGO. Classical and Quantum Gravity, 32(7), [074001]. https://doi.org/10.1088/0264-9381/32/7/074001

Advanced LIGO. / ligo Scientific Collaboration.

In: Classical and Quantum Gravity, Vol. 32, No. 7, 074001, 09.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ligo Scientific Collaboration 2015, 'Advanced LIGO', Classical and Quantum Gravity, vol. 32, no. 7, 074001. https://doi.org/10.1088/0264-9381/32/7/074001
ligo Scientific Collaboration. Advanced LIGO. Classical and Quantum Gravity. 2015 Apr 9;32(7). 074001. https://doi.org/10.1088/0264-9381/32/7/074001
ligo Scientific Collaboration. / Advanced LIGO. In: Classical and Quantum Gravity. 2015 ; Vol. 32, No. 7.
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