Acculturation and immigrant consumers' erceptions of advertisements: A study involving asian-indians

Durriya Z. Khairullah, Frances Tucker, Clint B. Tankersley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compares perceptions regarding Indian versus American print advertisements of Asian-Indian immigrants residing in the United States of America. It examines whether these perceptions varied with their degree of acculturation. Our results show that when Asian-Indian immigrants are treated as a homogeneous group without considering their degree of acculturation, the preferences for Indian versus American advertisements are mixed. However, when examined from an acculturative perspective, we find that as acculturation increased, subjects preferred American advertisements more, and Indian advertisements less. The results imply that degree of acculturation should be considered as a segmentation variable when developing an advertising strategy for immigrant consumers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-104
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Commerce and Management
Volume6
Issue number3-4
StatePublished - Mar 1 1996

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Immigrants
Asian studies
Acculturation
Asia
Segmentation
Advertising strategy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Acculturation and immigrant consumers' erceptions of advertisements : A study involving asian-indians. / Khairullah, Durriya Z.; Tucker, Frances; Tankersley, Clint B.

In: International Journal of Commerce and Management, Vol. 6, No. 3-4, 01.03.1996, p. 81-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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