Accommodating employees with and without disabilities

Lisa Schur, Lisa Nishii, Meera Adya, Douglas Kruse, Susanne M. Bruyère, Peter Blanck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Efforts to recruit and retain employees with disabilities are often tempered by employers' concerns over potential workplace accommodation costs. This study reports on accommodations requested and granted in intensive case studies of eight companies, based on more than 5,000 employee and manager surveys, and interviews and focus groups with 128 managers and employees with disabilities. Two unique contributions are that we analyze accommodations for employees without disabilities as well as for those with disabilities, and compare perspectives on accommodation costs and benefits among employees, their coworkers, and their managers. We find people with disabilities are more likely than those without disabilities to request accommodations, but the types of accommodations requested and the reported costs and benefits are similar for disability and non-disability accommodations. In particular, fears of high accommodation costs and negative reactions of coworkers are not realized; all groups tend to report generally positive coworker reactions. Multilevel models indicate granting accommodations has positive spillover effects on attitudes of coworkers, as well as a positive effect on attitudes of requesting employees, but only when coworkers are supportive. Consistent with recent theorizing and other studies, our results suggest the benefits from a corporate culture of flexibility and attention to the individualized needs of employees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)593-621
Number of pages29
JournalHuman Resource Management
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Cost-Benefit Analysis
Personnel
Organizational Culture
Costs and Cost Analysis
Disabled Persons
Focus Groups
Workplace
Fear
Interviews
Managers
Costs
Accommodation
Employees
Surveys and Questionnaires
Industry

Keywords

  • Accommodations
  • Disability
  • Work-life balance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Schur, L., Nishii, L., Adya, M., Kruse, D., Bruyère, S. M., & Blanck, P. (2014). Accommodating employees with and without disabilities. Human Resource Management, 53(4), 593-621. https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.21607

Accommodating employees with and without disabilities. / Schur, Lisa; Nishii, Lisa; Adya, Meera; Kruse, Douglas; Bruyère, Susanne M.; Blanck, Peter.

In: Human Resource Management, Vol. 53, No. 4, 2014, p. 593-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schur, L, Nishii, L, Adya, M, Kruse, D, Bruyère, SM & Blanck, P 2014, 'Accommodating employees with and without disabilities', Human Resource Management, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 593-621. https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.21607
Schur, Lisa ; Nishii, Lisa ; Adya, Meera ; Kruse, Douglas ; Bruyère, Susanne M. ; Blanck, Peter. / Accommodating employees with and without disabilities. In: Human Resource Management. 2014 ; Vol. 53, No. 4. pp. 593-621.
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