A Social Identity Threat Perspective on Why Partisans May Engage in Greater Victim Blaming and Sexual Assault Myth Acceptance in the #MeToo Era

Rebecca R. Ortiz, Andrea M. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined how U.S. partisans (N = 1,154) may engage in greater victim blaming and sexual assault myth acceptance to defend their political identities in the #MeToo era. The more Republicans and Democrats identified with being a member of their political party and reported feeling defensive when members from their political party are criticized, the more accepting they were of common sexual assault myths and thus the less likely they were to perceive sexual assault as a serious issue in need of addressing and the #MeToo movement as having a positive impact in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalViolence Against Women
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • #MeToo movement
  • political party
  • rape myths
  • sexual assault
  • victim blaming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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