A qualitative investigation of users' discovery, access, and organization of video games as information objects

Jin Ha Lee, Rachel Clarke, Stephanie Rossi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Video games are popular consumer products as well as research subjects, yet little exists about how players and other stakeholders find video games and what information they need to select, acquire and play video games. With the aim of better understanding people's game-related information needs and behaviour, we conducted 56 semi-structured interviews with users who find, play, purchase, collect and recommend video games. Participants included gamers, parents, collectors, industry professionals, librarians, educators and scholars. From this user data, we derive and discuss key design implications for video game information systems: designing for target user populations, enabling recommendations based on appeals, offering multiple automatic organization options and providing relationship-based, user-generated, subject and visual metadata. We anticipate this work will contribute to building future video game information systems with new and improved access to games.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)833-850
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Information Science
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

computer game
Information systems
organization
Consumer products
Metadata
information system
Industry
purchase
appeal
librarian
parents
stakeholder
educator
industry
interview

Keywords

  • Appeal factors
  • metadata
  • player types
  • user behaviour
  • user needs
  • video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

A qualitative investigation of users' discovery, access, and organization of video games as information objects. / Lee, Jin Ha; Clarke, Rachel; Rossi, Stephanie.

In: Journal of Information Science, Vol. 42, No. 6, 2015, p. 833-850.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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