A proposed genome of mobile and situated crowdsourcing and its design implications for encouraging contributions

Yun Huang, Alain Shema, Huichuan Xia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A number of papers have surveyed mobile crowdsourcing systems and, to a lesser extent, situated crowdsourcing systems. These surveys have either contributed a comprehensive taxonomy of the diverse application domains where the systems have tapped into or have characterized different components of the system platforms. In this paper, we present a survey of mobile and situated crowdsourcing systems by addressing fundamental questions about user contributions that system designers pose when building new systems or evaluating existing ones. We select and analyze 40 mobile and situated crowdsourcing systems for which prototypes were deployed and studied in the real world. Inspired by the MIT's genetic model of collective intelligence, we propose our genetic model and new genes for mobile and situated crowdsourcing systems by examining user contributions to the selected systems. We present the observed patterns of different genes and discuss how the model can be used to create new applications and design ideas. By reviewing the existing design principles of online communities, we also provide examples to illustrate how unique genes inspire new design suggestions for encouraging user contributions in the context of mobile and situated crowdsourcing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-80
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Human Computer Studies
Volume102
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Keywords

  • Design suggestions
  • Genome
  • Mobile crowdsourcing
  • Situated crowdsourcing
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Education
  • Engineering(all)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Hardware and Architecture

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