A pilot study on the effects of ventilation rate on creativity performance

Jingjing Wang, Monica Burris, Alan Hedge, Tiffany A. Koszalka, Jianshun S. Zhang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Effects of indoor environment on the performance of creativity and productivity were studied in a simulated office with an outdoor airflow rate of 5 or 20 L/(s·p), with other environmental parameters constant. The research was conducted with twenty subjects performing a series of computerized tasks, consisting of creativity tasks (Compound Remote Associate (CRA), Alternative Uses Task (AUT), and Toy Construction Task (TCT)), productivity tasks (typing and arithmetic), mood state and perceived IEQ questionnaires. Subjects self-assessed that they had a clearer head (p<0.049), perceived fresher air and exerted less effort under the higher ventilation rate (HV). Slightly increasing tendency was observed in the performance of CRA, TCT and productivity tasks with HV, although, none of the differences were statistically significant. The test outcomes indicated that short-term exposure to increased ventilation improved certain self-reported symptoms but did not significantly improve creativity or productivity performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Pages331-336
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Jun 5 2011Jun 10 2011

Publication series

Name12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Volume1

Other

Other12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period6/5/116/10/11

Keywords

  • Creativity
  • IEQ
  • Outdoor airflow rate
  • Perceived air quality
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A pilot study on the effects of ventilation rate on creativity performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Wang, J., Burris, M., Hedge, A., Koszalka, T. A., & Zhang, J. S. (2011). A pilot study on the effects of ventilation rate on creativity performance. In 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 (pp. 331-336). (12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011; Vol. 1).