A MULTI-LEVEL APPROACH TO ADDRESSING DIET-RELATED CHRONIC DISEASE AND FOOD INSECURITY AMONG LOW-INCOME INDEPENDENT SENIORS IN SYRACUSE, NY

Kristina Didio, Susan Fukes, Christine Santella, Cynthia Wisor, Jennifer L. Wilkins

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Low-income independent-living seniors in the City of Syracuse, NY are at an increased risk for diet-related chronic diseases due to limited affordability and access to healthy food, low food and nutrition-related knowledge, limited mobility, and lack of awareness of available food programs. Over 15% of Syracuse residents are aged 65 and over, and this age group is growing. Using the PRECEDE PROCEED model, we identified Predisposing, Enabling, and Reinforcing factors of relevance. Program goals are to increase food security and reduce incidence of diet-related chronic diseases among seniors in Syracuse, NY. The Health Belief Model (HBM) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) provide the theory base for a multi-level intervention, designed to increase awareness of diet-related disease risk and facilitate behavioral change. Planned intervention strategies include developing partnerships with corner stores, advocating for improved walkability of city sidewalks, providing education addressing misconceptions associated with SNAP benefits, and increasing awareness of available assistance with the SNAP application process as part of the multi-level Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) approach. Awareness of available resources for local seniors will be promoted through social media and a series of flyers strategically placed throughout the community. Community partnerships facilitate the implementation of this program. Evaluation of intended outcomes is planned at one, five and ten years through pre- and post-program participant surveys and publicly-available health and demographic data. PSE approaches hold much promise for addressing healthy food access, food security and diet quality issues Syracuse seniors experience.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
StatePublished - Apr 4 2019
EventNYS Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting and Expo - Marriott Hotel, Syracuse, NY, United States
Duration: Apr 5 2019Apr 6 2019
https://www.eatrightny.org/ame2019

Conference

ConferenceNYS Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting and Expo
Abbreviated titleNYSAND AME
CountryUnited States
CitySyracuse, NY
Period4/5/194/6/19
Internet address

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Food Supply
Chronic Disease
Causality
Environmental Policy
Diet
Food
Social Media
Independent Living
Health
Age Groups
Demography
Education
Incidence

Cite this

Didio, K., Fukes, S., Santella, C., Wisor, C., & Wilkins, J. L. (2019). A MULTI-LEVEL APPROACH TO ADDRESSING DIET-RELATED CHRONIC DISEASE AND FOOD INSECURITY AMONG LOW-INCOME INDEPENDENT SENIORS IN SYRACUSE, NY. Abstract from NYS Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting and Expo, Syracuse, NY, United States.

A MULTI-LEVEL APPROACH TO ADDRESSING DIET-RELATED CHRONIC DISEASE AND FOOD INSECURITY AMONG LOW-INCOME INDEPENDENT SENIORS IN SYRACUSE, NY. / Didio, Kristina; Fukes, Susan; Santella, Christine; Wisor, Cynthia; Wilkins, Jennifer L.

2019. Abstract from NYS Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting and Expo, Syracuse, NY, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Didio, K, Fukes, S, Santella, C, Wisor, C & Wilkins, JL 2019, 'A MULTI-LEVEL APPROACH TO ADDRESSING DIET-RELATED CHRONIC DISEASE AND FOOD INSECURITY AMONG LOW-INCOME INDEPENDENT SENIORS IN SYRACUSE, NY' NYS Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting and Expo, Syracuse, NY, United States, 4/5/19 - 4/6/19, .
Didio K, Fukes S, Santella C, Wisor C, Wilkins JL. A MULTI-LEVEL APPROACH TO ADDRESSING DIET-RELATED CHRONIC DISEASE AND FOOD INSECURITY AMONG LOW-INCOME INDEPENDENT SENIORS IN SYRACUSE, NY. 2019. Abstract from NYS Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting and Expo, Syracuse, NY, United States.
Didio, Kristina ; Fukes, Susan ; Santella, Christine ; Wisor, Cynthia ; Wilkins, Jennifer L. / A MULTI-LEVEL APPROACH TO ADDRESSING DIET-RELATED CHRONIC DISEASE AND FOOD INSECURITY AMONG LOW-INCOME INDEPENDENT SENIORS IN SYRACUSE, NY. Abstract from NYS Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting and Expo, Syracuse, NY, United States.1 p.
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abstract = "Low-income independent-living seniors in the City of Syracuse, NY are at an increased risk for diet-related chronic diseases due to limited affordability and access to healthy food, low food and nutrition-related knowledge, limited mobility, and lack of awareness of available food programs. Over 15{\%} of Syracuse residents are aged 65 and over, and this age group is growing. Using the PRECEDE PROCEED model, we identified Predisposing, Enabling, and Reinforcing factors of relevance. Program goals are to increase food security and reduce incidence of diet-related chronic diseases among seniors in Syracuse, NY. The Health Belief Model (HBM) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) provide the theory base for a multi-level intervention, designed to increase awareness of diet-related disease risk and facilitate behavioral change. Planned intervention strategies include developing partnerships with corner stores, advocating for improved walkability of city sidewalks, providing education addressing misconceptions associated with SNAP benefits, and increasing awareness of available assistance with the SNAP application process as part of the multi-level Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) approach. Awareness of available resources for local seniors will be promoted through social media and a series of flyers strategically placed throughout the community. Community partnerships facilitate the implementation of this program. Evaluation of intended outcomes is planned at one, five and ten years through pre- and post-program participant surveys and publicly-available health and demographic data. PSE approaches hold much promise for addressing healthy food access, food security and diet quality issues Syracuse seniors experience.",
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