A longitudinal investigation of work-family strains and gains, work commitment, and subsequent employment status among partnered working mothers

Matthew K. Mulvaney, Laurel A. McNall, Rebecca A. Morrissey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the work-family interface on mothers' commitment to work and the implications of that work commitment for subsequent employment. The study included a sample of employed partnered mothers who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, all of whom had given birth at the beginning of the study. Longitudinal analyses were specified to isolate the predictors of change in work commitment during the first 3 years following childbirth. Results indicate that perceived work-family strains were uniquely associated with decreased work commitment whereas perceived work-family gains were uniquely associated with increased work commitment during this period. In addition, greater work commitment during the first 3 years following childbirth was associated with a greater likelihood that the woman would be employed 9 years later. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-316
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • work commitment
  • work-family gains
  • work-family interface
  • work-family strains

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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