A health and demographic profile of noninstitutionalized older americans residing in environments with home modifications

Melissa Tabbarah, Merril Silverstein, Teresa Seeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: In this analysis the authors investigate the demographic characteristics, the health conditions/events, and the disabilities of community-dwelling Americans 70 years of age and older that are associated with residing in environments with specific home modifications. Methods: Data from a large population-based study of the elderly are used to estimate logistic regression equations that reveal profiles of older individuals who are likely to have distinct home modifications. Results: Having diseases such as diabetes and stroke, having experienced a hip fracture, a fall or a joint replacement, and having greater limitations with activities of daily living raise the likelihood of having home modifications. Low income, Hispanic, and African American elderly appear underrepresented among those with modifications. Discussion: The authors conclude that specialized housing alternatives will be an increasingly important issue in the future as individuals aim to achieve and maintain the delicate balance between their functional ability and their living environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-228
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2000
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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