A COMPARISON OF THREE INTERVENTIONS FOR INCREASING ORAL READING PERFORMANCE: APPLICATION OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL HIERARCHY

Edward J. Daly, Brian K. Martens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Scopus citations

Abstract

The instructional hierarchy is a behavior‐analytic model that links level of academic skill development (i.e., acquisition, fluency, generalization, adaptation) with appropriate instructional techniques. The present study used the instructional hierarchy to compare the effects of three instructional interventions (listening passage preview, subject passage preview, and taped words) on subjects' oral reading performance on word lists and passages. Subjects were 4 male students with learning disabilities who ranged in age from 8 years 10 months to 11 years 11 months. A multielement design was used to compare the effects of the three interventions to each other and to baseline. Results indicated that the listening passage preview intervention (which contained modeling, drill, and generalization components) produced the largest performance gains. The implications of these results for selecting academic interventions based on the instructional hierarchy are discussed. 1994 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-469
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Keywords

  • learning disabled
  • multielement design
  • oral reading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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