A comparison of performance feedback procedures on teachers' treatment implementation integrity and students' inappropriate behavior in special education classrooms

Florence D. DiGennaro, Brian K. Martens, Ava E. Kleinmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the extent to which treatment integrity of 4 special education teachers was affected by goal setting, performance feedback regarding student or teacher performance, and a meeting cancellation contingency. Teachers were trained to implement function-based treatment packages to address student problem behavior. In one condition, teachers set a goal for student behavior and received daily written feedback about student performance. In a second condition, teachers received daily written feedback about student performance as well as their own accuracy in implementing the intervention and would be able to avoid meeting with a consultant to practice missed steps by implementing the intervention with 100% integrity. This latter package increased treatment integrity the most above baseline levels. Higher levels of treatment integrity were significantly correlated with lower levels of student problem behavior for 3 of the 4 teacher-student dyads. Three of the 4 teachers also rated both feedback procedures as highly acceptable. Implications for increasing and maintaining treatment integrity by teachers via a consultation model are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-461
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Keywords

  • Avoidance contingency
  • Directed rehearsal
  • Feedback
  • Functional behavior assessment
  • Special education
  • Treatment integrity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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